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Planting & Growing Rhubarb

January 31, 2012 - GrowOrganic
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Related Products:
Vegetable Crowns
Vegetable Crowns
Rhubarb Crowns
Rhubarb Crowns
Foothill Fertilizer Mix 0.5-4.0-4.0 (50 Lb)
Foothill Fertilizer Mix 0.5-4.0-4.0 (50 Lb)
Peaceful Valley Compost (1 Cubic Ft)
Peaceful Valley Compost (1 Cubic Ft)
Foothill Fertilizer Mix 0.5-4.0-4.0 (25 Lb)
Foothill Fertilizer Mix 0.5-4.0-4.0 (25 Lb)
Want an easy edible that looks good too? Include rhubarb in your vegetable garden or your landscape, for brilliant color that the deer won’t bother. Perennial vegetables like rhubarb are such garden winners—plant them and have them in your garden for years to come, with very little maintenance. Tricia plants rhubarb in our new video, and talks about its easy care. Rhubarb can grow in full sun or part shade. RHUBARB PIE IN YOUR FUTURE The most popular reason to plant rhubarb is to be able…
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Growing Guide
Rhubarb Planting & Growing Guide (pdf)
Video Transcript
Hi I'm Tricia an organic gardener from USDA's zone eight and Rhubarb is a beautiful perennial vegetable that's great in pies and sauces but it also makes a beautiful border plant in your perennial garden. It's hardy down to zone four, it's deer resistant and it's easy to take care of. You need about one square yard of growing space per planted rhubarb and that should be enough for most families. The plants like a lot of sun but they'll also tolerate some shade and about the only place they don't do well is in the deep south. Rhubarb needs to be planted in well drained soil although the plant is relatively resistant to pests and disease it is susceptible to crown rot and that's where the plant rots right at where it meets the soil. Loosen the soil to a depth of about twelve to fifteen inches and work in a generous amount of compost and a balanced fertilizer like this foothill fertilizer. The best time to plant rhubarb is in the late winter or early spring and I'm going to use some of this booster blend to encourage the root growth. When planting the rhubarb it only needs to be covered by a couple of inches of soil pack the soil down with your hands around the plant but not directly over the crown. Water your newly planted rhubarb and don't harvest it the first year you can lightly harvest the second year and then fully harvest it in the third year but never take off more than a third of the stocks at one time and one word of caution about rhubarb only eat the stocks don't eat the leaves of the rhubarb because they contain oxalic acid and that'll make you sick. The stalks of your rhubarb could be green, red, pink or spotted but that will have no bearing on the delicious flavor .So plant some rhubarb make a pie and grow organic for life.

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Solutions: Deer

Categories: Vegetable Crowns, Rhubarb Crowns


Helen Slate Says:
Feb 18th, 2012 at 7:42 am

I love the videos and helpful hints!!

Ellen Sweeney Says:
Jan 19th, 2013 at 6:18 pm

I bought a house with a large bed of rhubarb. How much do I cut back in the winter and what part do I leave?
I understand that I don’t want to eat the leaves, but can I put them in my compost?

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