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Planting and Growing Artichokes

January 24, 2012 - GrowOrganic
Planting and Growing Artichokes Grasshoppers Tomato Hornworm Growing Broccoli Kefir Growing Peas Espalier Deer Resistant Plants Herb Spiral Birdhouses Square Foot Gardening Kombucha Growing Herbs Indoors How to Do a Soil Survey Microgreens Greenhouses

Related Products:
Vegetable Crowns
Vegetable Crowns
Artichoke Crowns
Artichoke Crowns
Foothill Fertilizer Mix 0.5-4.0-4.0 (25 Lb)
Foothill Fertilizer Mix 0.5-4.0-4.0 (25 Lb)
Foothill Fertilizer Mix 0.5-4.0-4.0 (50 Lb)
Foothill Fertilizer Mix 0.5-4.0-4.0 (50 Lb)
Greensand (50 Lb)
Greensand (50 Lb)

Growing Guide
Artichoke Planting & Growing Guide (pdf)
Video Transcript
Hi I'm Tricia an organic gardener in USDA's zone eight. Artichokes are a wonderful vegetable for eating but they're also a beautiful landscape plant, there native to the mediterranean and they're cold hardy down to about zone six,
you can grow them as an annual if you're in a colder climate i'll show you how to plant them.

Artichokes will produce for about six to seven years but every three years you can divide the plans to get even more plants and the long life of the plant makes soil preparation essential to good yields. Choose a sunny location, artichokes also need plenty of space, they can grow to about four feet tall and can have a spread of about six feet. If you like a hot summer climate you might also want to think about some afternoon shade. Also don't plant your artichokes too close to the roots of other big plants such as trees or vines they don't like a lot of competition for nutrients. Good crops start with good soil, i'm gonna apply a large quantity of this compost into the first twelve inches of the soil and I'm going to use this broad fork to do it. At the same you want to mix in a slow release fertilizer with phosphorus and potassium like this foothill fertilizer mix. It also makes the soil more alkaline which is great for artichokes cause they like a pH of about six-and-a-half to eight, dig it in at least eight inches deep so that it's available for the roots. Before planting the artichoke crowns make sure and water your bed very well. Artichokes can be planted from seed but you'll get better results if you plant from these root sections. In warmer climates like here these artichokes can be planted in the winter in colder climates you can heel them in until early spring. Dig a hole about six to eight inches deep and to encourage root growth put in some prime start booster blend which is formulated with mycorrhizae which really help root growth, just cover the root with about six to eight inches of soil, mulch the bed to prevent weed competition. In the spring you can fertilize with a nitrogen fertilizer, give it some water and give it some love and in the spring it will love you back, grow organic for life.

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Solutions: Deer

Categories: Vegetable Crowns, Artichoke Crowns


Gina Woodyatt Says:
Jan 28th, 2012 at 9:22 am

I just saw your planting artichoke crowns video.  Trisha said the plant can grow to have a large spread, so why was she planting the crowns so close to the fence?  I can understand supporting the height of the plant with the fence, but won’t the fence hinder one side of its growth?  Can you trellis this kind of plant like an apple tree and just encourage lateral growth?

Thanks!

Charlotte from Peaceful Valley Says:
Jan 10th, 2013 at 2:35 pm

Gina, Sharp eyes! This was just a temporary planting for a demonstration. Artichokes can have a leaf spread of 6’ across.

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