Growing Raspberries & Blackberries

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Support Your Red & Golden Raspberries In our video on planting and growing raspberries and blackberries, Tricia shows how she grows her blackberries and black raspberries in the “hill method”, with the canes growing in clumps next to a fence or post for support. Boysenberrries are related to blackberries and should be grown the same way. If you live in an area where the soil dries quickly, berries can be planted on flat soil (no hilling). Red and golden raspberries don’t just…
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Growing Guide
Cane Berry Planting & Growing Guide (pdf)
Video Transcript
Hi I'm Tricia an organic gardener. Brambles like blackberries, raspberries and boysenberries are a wonderful fruit for the home garden and they're easy to grow I'll show you how. Brambles are also called caneberries and they're not picky when it comes to soil but they need good drainage. I've been soaking this thornless blackberry for a couple of hours and now I'm going to dig a hole about the size of the root system. Dig a shallow hole big enough to accommodate the roots I'm also going to add some of this prime start booster blend to encourage the root growth. So we're just going to plant the blackberry to the same level that it was planted in the nursery. Then I'm going to top it off with a little organic compost. So you just want to snip off the cane about two to three inches from the ground this will help prevent disease and it's important to prune your berries you want to prune to prevent disease and to increase yields and you're going to prune twice a year. Once in the summer before you get the berries and once after harvest. Blackberries and black raspberries are grown in what we call a hill method meaning they're grown in a clump next to a post or a fence. Blackberries and black raspberries may have the same color fruit but they're different: one of the distinctions is that their core on a raspberry will stay with the plant and the core on a blackberry will come off with the fruit.

During the dormant season you want to prune any canes that fruited last year down to the ground. The canes are easy to tell apart cut all the dead canes and leave the dark barked live canes and you want to thin out these little weak canes you want no more than about six to eight really strong canes. Once you've thinned them out now you just want to head back the canes about four or five feet from the ground and then you want to head back the laterals the canes that are coming off the main cane to about twelve to eighteen inches. Here's a nice little bud I'm going to head mine off right after that. So after you've trimmed back and cut back all your laterals you're done. Today we're going to revitalize a sprawling berry patch. Blackberries and black raspberries drop their canes and set root in the dirt that's how they spread it's called tip layering. To avoid the tip rooting just prune these canes in the summer before they hit the ground. Red and gold raspberries do best growing in a hedgerow because they spread by the roots and they need ample room to grow. Unlike blackberries or black raspberries red and gold raspberries require some kind of a structure for support. You're going to cut the cane that fruited last summer and you can tell because it's grayish looking and it's dead. Now that I've cut out all the third year canes that were dead I'm going to prune back the rest of the canes to about fifteen canes per foot. Leave the healthier thick canes and prune out the little skinny ones. You're going to try to leave about four to five inches between each cane. For any canes that have escaped your hedgerow dig them out these escape artists that we dug up would be a great gift for a neighbor. And be sure and destroy all of the clippings they can cause disease if left in the hedgerow. Add some mulch to prevent weed competition and retain moisture. This summer enjoy baskets and baskets of berries and grow organic for life

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Categories: Berry Plants, Blackberry Plants, Boysenberry Plants, Raspberry Plants, Fruits & Berries


mike hurley Says:
Jan 18th, 2015 at 7:02 am

Trish: I really enjoy your video help guides.  You do a great job with them.  Keep ‘em coming.
(Maybe I’ll finally get those red raspberries to fruit.)

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