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Soil Blocks

March 14, 2012 - GrowOrganic
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Soil blocks let you germinate seeds and grow seedlings all in one spot! When you grow with seed blocks there are no seed trays, no shifting to pots, and minimal risk of transplant shock. How can you do it? Use one of our Soil Blockers to make soil cubes that stand alone. Tricia shows how simple it is to work with a Soil Blocker mechanical device in our video, Soil Blocks. You can’t rely on traditional potting soil to make soil blocks—it doesn’t have the right consistency and the…
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Video Transcript
Hi I'm Tricia a California organic gardener. It's raining here a perfect day for starting seeds. Today I'm going to demonstrate a technique called soil blocking So blocking is very common in Europe and there are many benefits for example you don't have to spend money on trays and you can reduce the risk of transplant shock. To make the soil blocks you'll need a soil blocker I like this one from Ladbrooke and some good potting mix and I use the Quickroot. The Peaceful Valley Quickroot is the perfect medium for starting with soil blocks. Wet part of the Quickroot to the consistency of stiff oatmeal and then let it sit for about one to two hours. Don't moisten all of your medium at one time because you may need to add more dry medium later to get the right consistency. Now that the medium has been soaking for a couple of hours I'm going to start making the blocks. This two inch blocker works great for most starts. Charge the blocker by pressing it into the soil two to three times don't worry about over compacting the soil. Then just scrape off the excess soil from the bottom. Set the blocker in your flat and push down the plunger gently lifting up the blocker. Notice the little indentation in the soil block that's where the seed is going to go and thats created by the little pins in the soil blocker. There's different size seed pins like this little one for seeds that are small and then there's a larger one for seeds that need to be planted with more depth when you're ready to replace the pins in your soil blocker it's easy. Your soil blocker will come with pins but if your going to replace the pins you'll replace them with this new style quick release pin for easier installation. If you're going to put the "cubic pins" in the soil blocker you'll need a phillips head screw driver with a magnetic tip for space consideration or for quicker germination and ease of heating some gardeners prefer to start seed in these little mini blocks it's really easy to pot up with these soil blocks. Once your little block is ready to pot up just pop them into a bigger block like so. When it comes to planting your seeds make sure you only put one seed per block. You can either pinch the soil over the seed or for most seeds they will germinate just fine on the top of the block. You wont need to water your soil blocks for the first three days or so but then you'll need to water often but a little tiny bit and I recommend using a fine mist nozzle like the Fogg-it nozzle or a hand sprayer. Make sure you water all sides of the block the blocks on the edges will dry out faster. If you'd like more information about soil blocking then I recommend this book "Transplants and Soil Blocks". So get your seeds started and grow organic for life.

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Categories: Organic Seeds, Organic Heirloom Seeds, Organic Vegetable Seeds, Organic Herb Seeds, Organic Bulk Seeds, Organic Hybrid Seeds, Vegetable Seeds, Vegetable Seeds Organic, Vegetable Seeds Heirloom, Vegetable Seeds Bulk, Tomato Seeds, Hybrid Vegetable Seeds, Bulk Seeds, Bulk Organic Seeds, Bulk Vegetable Seeds, Bulk Wildflower Seeds, Bulk Herb Seeds, Heirloom Seeds, Heirloom Seeds Organic, Heirloom Tomato Seeds, Heirloom Vegetable Seeds, Heirloom Flower Seeds, Flower Seeds, Annual Flower Seeds, Bulk Wildflower Seeds, Heirloom Flower Seeds, Perennial Flower Seeds, Wildflower Seeds, Herb Seeds, Herb Seeds Organic, Bulk Herb Seeds, Medicinal Herb Seeds, Seed Starting, Soil Blocker, Growing Medium, Organic Compost, Growing Medium Ingredients, Organic Quickroot, Horticultural Vermiculite, Sprayers, Backpack Sprayer, Hand Sprayer, 2 Gallon Sprayer, 4 Gallon Backpack Sprayer, 3 Gallon Sprayer


Bobby Bad Boy Says:
Mar 17th, 2012 at 10:52 am

Patricia - you look so adorable on a rainy day!

The video states to start one seed per block, what Says:
Feb 5th, 2014 at 9:08 am

Dawn Daoust

Dawn Daoust Says:
Feb 5th, 2014 at 9:12 am

sorry about the last post! What I meant to say is: The video states 1 seed per block.  Im wondering about very tiny seeds such as marjoram. Still 1? Thank you for all the amazing info on this site. SO appreciated.

Stephanie Brown Says:
Feb 6th, 2014 at 5:39 pm

Hello Dawn, Yes, go ahead and plant multiple seeds per block if you want. It’s perfectly fine to thin them later. For seeds with a low germination rate like basil or parsley can also benefit from having multiple seeds sown. Good luck!

Phil Tierney Says:
Feb 28th, 2015 at 8:14 am

Been using the soil block system for several years now. Have had great luck with miniblocks for lettuce, herbs, chives (5-10 seeds per block) etc. which I mostly transplant directly to garden without moving to larger blocks. Also good success with digitalis and other flowers. I use the larger 2” blocks for rooting cuttings, too. Love em and love this supplier!

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