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How to Make Yogurt

October 18, 2011 - GrowOrganic
How to Make Yogurt Fall Perennial Vegetable Care Fruit Trees - A Selection Guide Winter Garden Tips Planting Bulbs Getting Rid of Aphids Growing Radishes How to Dehydrate Food Growing Onions, Leeks, and Shallots Seed Saving Cover Crops for the Garden Indoor Citrus Growing Carrots Mushroom Plugs Grasshoppers Tomato Hornworm

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Cheese Making Kits
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Making Cheese, Butter & Yogurt
Making Cheese, Butter & Yogurt
“Eat your yogurt” is now widely recognized as healthy advice. So our our new video about how to make yogurt can not only save you money, but boost your well being. According to the University of Michigan Integrative Medicine department, yogurt “can help re-establish a healthy bacterial balance in the digestive tract that may have been disrupted by poor diet, illness, or medications.” The reliable site WebMD agrees that the active cultures in yogurt can improve a range of gastrointestinal…
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You can make your own yogurt and yogurt cheese easily. In our new video Tricia makes yogurt in her kitchen using her Excalibur dehydrator as the heat source. We have frozen Yogurt Culture available and a Gourmet Home Dairy Cheese Kit to help you prepare yogurt at home. Just take three more steps and you can have yogurt cheese as well. Choose any kind of milk (cow, goat, sheep) for your yogurt and yogurt cheese. Decide if you want to use non-fat or whole milk, or something in between. Customize the…
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Video Transcript
Hi I'm Tricia a California organic gardener. Today I'm going to be making yogurt which is a healthy and tasty companion for all your preserved fruits and berries. Yogurt is one of the easiest dairy products to make the only specialized equipment that you need is a thermometer that will measure up to two hundred and twenty degrees of heat that you can insert into the milk. I'm going to be making my yogurt in this dehydrator that makes incubating it a snap. It's really important to disinfect your work surfaces your hands and all your utensils with hot soapy water. As far as ingredients you need four cups of any kind of milk; whole, skim, sheep, cow or goat, one-quarter cup of plain yogurt with live and active cultures and two thirds of a cap of powdered milk if you want creamer yogurt texture. Once everything is disinfected you want to start by adding your powdered milk to your liquid milk and again powdered milk is optional. Once mixed you want to pour the mixture into a double boiler or you can just use a regular sauce pan as long as you constantly stir while its cooking. If the milk burns the yogurt is going to taste burned that's why i like to use the double boiler. Insert your thermometer into the milk until it gets to a hundred ninety five degrees hold the temperature of the milk at a hundred eighty to two hundred degrees for ten minutes and don't let the milk boil. While the milk is heating i'm preparing a big bowl of cold water thats going to help us cool it down after it's finished It's ready now. So i'm going to cool it down to a hundred and twenty degrees. So don't let it cool down below a hundred and ten degrees. Then were just going to take a quarter of a cup of the milk and add a quarter of a cap of the yogurt plain yogurt and mix it up. Just pour the mixture into any heat proof sterilized container. Whatever type of jar you use make sure that you have a lid for it. I love these little Weck jars because there so easy to use their perfect size for individual yogurts and they're really cute. So I'm just going to place the yogurt into the bottom of the dehydrator and I'm going to set the temperature to a hundred and fifteen degrees this really makes this step a snap compared to other methods cause it keeps the temperature constant. The yogurt should take about three hours to set if it hasn't set by then check it every fifteen minutes. Mine is ready I'm going to add some of my blackberry preserves and make a fruit yogurt Mmmmm make yogurt and grow organic for life.

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Categories: Cheese Making Kits, Food Processing & Preservation, Canning Supplies, Food Dehydrator


Eric Schwandt Says:
Oct 27th, 2011 at 2:31 pm

By heating the milk above 120 degrees you pastorize it and lose all of the benefits of raw milk.  We get great results (without the dry milk) by heating the milk between 90 and 100 farenheit and leaving it in the dehydrator or warm place at the same temperature for 24 hours.  For your health’s sake make sure to use GMO free and rbgH free milk.

Eric Schwandt Says:
Oct 28th, 2011 at 9:19 am

Ooops.  Correction on the above post.  The initial warming of the raw milk is 115 degrees and then it is kept warm between 95-100 for 24 hours.

LindaJasmine Adeniran Says:
Apr 9th, 2012 at 2:25 am

I don’t have a dehydrator so where should i put the yogurt it in order for it to set?

Trish Says:
Sep 5th, 2014 at 6:47 pm

Can I use lactose free organic milk and lactose free organic yogurt?
Thank You

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