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How to Make Dill Pickles

July 19, 2012 - GrowOrganic
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THE SAFE WAY TO CAN DILL PICKLES Canning is serious business. It’s a great way to feed your family throughout the year, with the bounty of your own garden, or with crops from a local farmer. Pickled dill cucumbers are a favorite treat from the pantry shelf and our latest video shows you how to make them. Follow these safety tips so that your pickles will be perfect, and perfectly safe. START WITH THE CUCUMBER Cut the blossom end off the cuke or the pickles may become too soft and unsafe to…
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When you’re pickling cucumbers, you must cut off the blossom ends. It’s easy to tell which is the blossom end if you’re harvesting cucumbers from your own garden. You can see the stem and you’ll know that the blossom was on the opposite side of the fruit. If you buy cucumbers from the store they probably won’t have any stems. Find the blossom end by looking for the rough dot (instead of the smooth, indented dot) at the end of the cuke. PICKLING Why does this matter?…
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Video Transcript
Hi I'm Wendy Van Wagner and I'm Joe Meade and you're with us here at "In The Kitchen" cooking school where will be making and canning dill pickles today.

To make the pickles you'll need four pounds pickling cucumbers, six heads of fresh dill, three-and-a-half tablespoons non iodized kosher salt, three cups five percent white vinegar, three cups of de-chlorinated soft water, one-and-a-half tablespoons of yellow mustard seeds, six cloves of white skin garlic and six bay leaves. You want to wash all your utensils and jars USDA does say though that if your going to be processing for more than ten minutes you'll just need clean jars you won't need to pre-sterilize them if you have a dishwasher and your doing a bunch of jars at one time you can also run it through your sanitizer rinse. Make sure to inspect your jars so I like to go around the inside and around the top just feel for any chips or irregularities to make sure that its safe to use you want to make sure that the rubber sealing rings are soft and flexible so that you get a good seal also inspect the lid for any chips or cracks. When making pickles it's an important part of food safety to use a tested recipe and not deviate from the ratios given in the recipe it's important to use a five percent vinegar or fifty grain vinegar be sure not to use a homemade vinegar or something where you're not sure of the acidity as that may make your pickles unsafe to eat make sure you use the freshest pickling cucumbers you can find, slicing style or burpless cucumbers do not make good pickles you wanna select young even slightly immature cucumbers you want them to be thin skinned and about four inches long. To prepare your cucumbers wash them thoroughly no matter where you got them and slice off the blossom end and leave about a quarter inch of stem.

For the brine we need three cups water, three cups vinegar, three and a half tablespoons of salt and one and a half tablespoons yellow mustard seeds. So i'm bringing my brine to a boil and i'm also stirring it a little bit to make sure that all of the salt dissolves add a dill head, a bay leaf and a peel of garlic clove to each jar if you want you can also add a pinch of pickling spice. If you hold the jar at a little bit of an angle it will allow you to fill the jar completely up now it's time to add the hot brine leave half an inch of head space that's the area from the lid to the top of the liquid and so i'm taking a plastic spactula just something pretty thin that you can fit between the pickles and the jar and I'm releasing any air bubbles and you want to go around and do that to each jar. Okay so we're all ready to seal up our jars but before you do that you want to take a towel a clean towel and wipe the rim of each jar and you wanna get on the inside too. So were going to add our lids and rings to the jar for extra tall jars like these beautiful asparagus jars I'm going to go ahead and just use a large stock pot that i have. I'm going to add hot water cause you wanna make sure that there's two inches of water above your jars you want to put up a steamer rack or something in the bottom just to protect your jars while they're in the water bath. Once the water in your water bath comes to a boil that's when your canning time starts this recipe calls for thirty minutes. When the processing time is completed turn the flame off but allow the jars to sit in the hot water for at least another five minutes remove the jars from the hot water and place them on a cooling rack a towel or onto a wooden cutting board and allow them to cool completely and even after there cool you want to leave them undisturbed overnight so that the seal really has a chance to take hold. So once the jars cooled you want to remove the metal clips and you can test the seal by gently placing your fingers on the edge and pulling up if you don't get any resistance then obviously it hasn't sealed and if that's the case stick those in your fridge and enjoy these pickles first. Now all you need to let them do is rest for two to three weeks before enjoying them thanks for joining us again "In The Kitchen" so get out there grow some cucumbers, can some pickles and grow organic for life!

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Corie Ralston Says:
Aug 22nd, 2012 at 7:14 pm

Hi,
I appreciate all the videos you guys make and how clear and useful they are! I did want to tell you that I followed the dill pickle recipe and the pickles came out very soggy. After consulting several other recipes, I believe the time you say to cook them (30 minutes) is WAY too long. The spices were very good, though, so we are going to try a 5 minute cooking time on our next batch and hopefully the pickles will be crisp.
Corie

Jeff Martin Says:
Jul 20th, 2013 at 11:22 am

The Ball Blue Book (the bible for most canners) says hot pack “bread and butter” pickles for 10 minutes and “dills” for 15 minutes. I have only pickled beets, but this year I am going to pickle cukes “kosher-style” because I enjoy the added hottness. Ball also recommends cutting off the blossom end. THAT is good to know, cuz I didn’t know it. :{)

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