It appears you do not have Javascript enabled in your browser. Javascript must be enabled for our website to display and function properly.
Free Seeds On Online Orders Over $50

Curing Olives

December 14, 2012 - GrowOrganic
Curing Olives Sierra Harvest - Food Love Project Farmers Market Sierra Harvest - Soup Night Sierra Harvest - NU Salad Bar Sierra Harvest - Visit to Super Tuber Farm Harvest of the Month at Deer Creek Elementary Grafting Fruit Trees with Dave Wilson Nursery The Journey Of A Bare Root Tree Environmental Disorders How to Can Tomatoes at Home How to Control Erosion How to Build a Raised Garden Box How to Prevent Ticks How to Grow Organic Sunflowers How to Grow Organic Melons How to Freeze Plums

Related Products:
Food Preservation
Food Preservation
Food Processing & Preservation
Food Processing & Preservation
Fermentation Supplies
Fermentation Supplies
Fruit Trees
Fruit Trees
Olive Trees
Olive Trees
You can see it all now—it’s a sunny day and you’re sitting at a wooden table in your olive grove, eating olives and crusty bread, and drinking wine with your friends and family. You grew and cured those olives yourself. The question is—WHICH olives? Which olive trees will get prized positions in your olive grove? It’s like growing any other edible—grow the flavors you like to eat. You may already have favorite olives, or perhaps you’re from the school of…
Read More»

USDA Zone 7 is typically considered too cold for olive trees. But we’re gardeners, which means we want to grow beautiful trees that aren’t recommended for our zones. That goes both ways too—for every New Yorker wanting a Meyer lemon tree we have a Southern Californian longing to grow Bartlett pears. Tricia plants an olive tree in our latest video and that probably has you fired up about the beautiful and long-lived trees, with their crop of health-giving fruit. Here’s how…
Read More»
Growing Guide
Olive Tree Planting & Growing Guide (pdf)
Video Transcript
Hi Im Tricia an organic gardener and I grow organically for a healthy and safe food supply, for a clean and sustainable environment, for an enjoyable and rewarding experience.

Olives are tasty and nutritious and if you've ever eaten a raw olive you know that they must be cured before eating. Theres several ways to cure olives; water, lye, a dry salting or lactic fermentation using a brine and the lactate fermentation is the way we're going to demonstrate today. Today ill be making Greek style brined olives, for this style of olives start with either all green or all-black ripe olives. It is helpful to select olives of a similar size for a more even curing discard olives that are bruised or scarred. As far as the supplies that youll need; at least a court but preferably bigger container made of glass plastic or ceramic i'm using this "Harsch" fermenting crock, a gallon size pot for mixing the brine, ripe olives and an ample amount of pickling salt.

Start off by putting the olives into the crock the ratio of salt to make the brine is three-quarters of a cup for every gallon of water. A third of the total water that your going to use for the brine needs to be hot so that the salt will dissolve faster. Then add the cool water after the salt dissolves before you add your brine to the olives put in your weight stones put a little cork plug so that the olives dont float up through the hole. Now it's time to add the brine make sure the brine covers the olives completely. I've moved my crock to an undisturbed location and i'm gonna let it sit here for about a week between sixty and eighty degrees. After a week you can mix up a second stronger brine using one-and-a-half cups of salt per gallon of water, drain off the first weaker brine and then add the strong brine this time we're gonna add a little bit of water into the reservoir this will prevent the growth of yeast on your olives while still allowing gas from inside the crock to bubble out. For bitter olives let them stay in the crock for about two months in the brine. Taste them if they taste good to you you can eat them right out of the crock in the brine. If you want them a little bit milder drain the brine and new brine and let them set for another month and then again you can eat them right in the brine. You dont have to live in Greece to have greek olives so cure some olives and grow organic for life!

Related Articles

Sierra Harvest - a Great Organization

Sierra Harvest - a Great Organization

January 21, 2016 - Suzanne at Peaceful Valley

Rootstocks-Unsung Heros

Rootstocks-Unsung Heros

January 14, 2016 - Suzanne at Peaceful Valley

Grow a Pomegranate Tree!

Grow a Pomegranate Tree!

November 12, 2015 - Meredith Cherry

Protecting Your Fruit Trees from Frost Damage

Protecting Your Fruit Trees from Frost Damage

October 30, 2015 - Meredith Cherry

Homemade Apple Butter and Other Preserves

Homemade Apple Butter and Other Preserves

October 22, 2015 - Meredith Cherry

Getting Ready for Tomato Canning

Getting Ready for Tomato Canning

October 1, 2015 - Meredith Cherry

Canning safety— tips Grandma didn’t know

Canning safety— tips Grandma didn’t know

August 11, 2015 - Peaceful Valley

How to Grow Melons

How to Grow Melons

July 30, 2015 - Meredith Cherry

Preserve your Harvest… in the Freezer!

Preserve your Harvest… in the Freezer!

July 16, 2015 - Meredith Cherry

When to Prune Fruit Trees

When to Prune Fruit Trees

June 29, 2015 - Meredith Cherry

Categories: Fruit Trees, Olive Trees, Homesteading Books, Food Preservation, Food Processing & Preservation, Fermentation Supplies


jill Says:
Jan 5th, 2014 at 1:12 pm

Wow, this website is incredible!  I’ve been an organic gardener for years and am finding this website extremely impressive with the vast array of well done videos and information you guys cover.  Thanks for having such a stellar project!

Reply to this post

Your Name (required) Email, won't be published (required)

Comment

Please enter the word you see in the image below:



Find Solutions Books Fertilizers Garden Tools Growing Supplies Homestead Irrigation Seasonal Items Seeds Weed and Pest Control Other